Incomplete phrase が the most natural way な日本語とは?


2外国人

The Japan Timesでとてもユニークな記事に出会いました。

To be a more complete Japanese speaker, leave your sentences incomplete
by Daniel Morales

最初、これ、なに?って思ったのですが、読んでいくうちに
確かにそうだよなって、納得したのです。

書き出しは、以下のような内容です。

Thoughts very rarely translate into language in completely formed phrases.
Sometimes it takes a stab or two to articulate what exactly it is you’re trying to say.

The opposite, however, is also true:
Incomplete language can and often does imply perfectly complete ideas, and
sometimes an incomplete phrase is the most natural way to express something.
And Japanese is a language where this seems especially true.

最近は、日本にくる外国人を取り上げるテレビ番組がいくつかありますが(バナナマンがMC、ボビー・オロゴンがナレーターをやっている、Youは何しに日本へなど)
みなさん、びっくりしませんか?なんでこんなに日本のことを知っているんだろう?なんでこんなに日本語がうまいのか?
好きこそものの上手なれ、習うより慣れろ、なんでしょうね。
で、おそらく日本語がうまいなって感じる原因の一つは、
日本語の特徴であるincomplete phraseをうまく使っているからなのではないかと
思ったのです。

Danielさんは、incomplete phraseな例としていくつか上げていますが、
その一つは、

One of the very first phrases students of the language learn is
お名前は? (O-namae wa?, “[What’s] your name?”)
This is not a complete sentence grammatically.

You can add 何ですか? (Nan desu ka?, What is?) and complete the sentence,
but it isn’t necessary; everyone in the conversation knows what’s being asked,
so in the interest of economy, it gets left out.

たしかに、そうなんです。
日本語では、O-namae wa?で終わることが多いんですよね。
でも、フォーマルなケースではcomplete sentenceを使うと思います。

そして、次に例として取り上げているのが、「って」。

This is also true of the casual quotative particle って (tte).
Tte is used to tag quoted speech, and it’s easy to leave off the verb 言う (iu, say)
when it’s unnecessary. For example, 来ないって (Konai-tte) is a perfectly good way
to say “Ayaka says she isn’t coming.”
Marvel for a moment at the efficiency of the Japanese language.

これも、たしかにそうなんですね。日本語の教科書では決して教えないでしょうね。

いやはや、こんなことに気付く外国人って、やっぱり、すごいですね。

(英語にはこういうincomplete phraseはないのかな??)

スポンサーリンク
スポンサーリンク
スポンサーリンク
  • このエントリーをはてなブックマークに追加
スポンサーリンク
スポンサーリンク